Relationships between craniofacial and neural development

The molecular and evolutionary relationships between the forming nervous system and the other craniofacial structures were at the focus of this meeting.

Participants

Organizers

Le Douarin Nicole, Creuzet Sophie (Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Richman Joy (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada), Rijli Filippo (Friedrich Miescher Institute (FMI), Basel, Switzerland)

Invited speakers

Brito Jose (Institute of Neurobiology, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Bronner-Fraser Marianne (Caltech, California, USA), Chuong Chen-Ming (University of Southern California, California, USA), Creuzet Sophie (Institute of Neurobiology, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Dupin Elisabeth (Institute of Neurobiology, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Fraser Scott (Caltech, California, USA), Helms Jill (StanfordUniversity, California, USA), Holland Linda (LaJolla, California, USA), Jeffery William (University of Maryland, Maryland, USA), Kuratani Shigeru (Riken, Japan), Le Douarin Nicole (Collège de France, Académie des Sciences), Martinez Salvador (Institue of Neurosciences, Alicante, Spain), Monsoro-Burq Anne-Hélène (Institut Curie, Orsay, France), Richman Joy (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada), Rijli Filippo (Friedrich Miescher Institute (FMI), Basel, Switzerland), Schlosser Gerhart (University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany), Smith Maya Meredith (Developmental Neurobiology, London), Vernier Philippe (Institute of Neurobiology, Gif-sur-Yvette, France)

Review

Relationships between craniofacial and neural development
by Marianne Bronner-Fraser
19 – 24 mai 2008

The vertebrate brain develops in association with neighboring tissues: neural crest, placodes, mesoderm and endoderm. The molecular and evolutionary relationships between the forming nervous system and the other craniofacial structures were at the focus of a recent meeting at the Fondation des Treilles in France. Entitled ‘Relationships between Craniofacial and Neural Development’, the meeting brought together researchers working on diverse species, the findings of whom provide clues as to the origin and diversity of the brain and facial regions that are involved in forming the ‘new head’ of vertebrates.

Read the meeting review “On the trail of the ‘new head’ in Les Treilles“, (Development 135, 2995-2999 (2008) doi:10.1242/dev.019901)

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